Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Treating addicted women: The significance of gender-responsive services
by Munoz-Duran, Sonia, M.S., California State University, Long Beach, 2011, 125; 1507775
Abstract (Summary)

The literature suggests that gender-responsive programming is imperative when treating women offenders with substance abuse problems. Addicted women face unique barriers during treatment that impede their successful recovery. Considering the historical disregard of the needs of female offenders, the current research explores how far the criminal justice system has come in addressing women's needs. Utilizing a sample of community-based treatment providers in California serving parolees participating in the Senate Bill 1453 (SB 1453) program, this study employs secondary analysis of interview data and content analysis of field notes to assess self-reported availability and actual delivery of the following six gender-responsive services: (1) trauma-informed; (2) family; (3) employment; (4) healthcare; (5) housing; and (6) aftercare. The current study also explores the context in which gender-specific services are addressed and discussed during meetings held by the treatment provider to evaluate women's treatment progress. The results suggest treatment providers are aware of women's special needs, yet the implementation of comprehensive services is still lacking.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Ireland, Connie Estrada
Commitee:
School: California State University, Long Beach
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 50/04M, Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Womens studies, Counseling Psychology, Criminology
Keywords:
Publication Number: 1507775
ISBN: 978-1-267-20441-7
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