Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Community college attrition: The continual rise in community college attrition
by Kinloch, Nattie Freeda, Ed.D., Fielding Graduate University, 2012, 85; 3491136
Abstract (Summary)

Community college attrition continues to rise. The lowest rate during the period of 1983–2008 for public two year community college retention was 51.3%, and the lowest retention rate for private two year colleges was 55.5% (Act, 2008, pp. 4). The purpose of this study is to examine the perspective of student retention by faculty members through faculty and student interactions. The study was conducted at Nattie Community College. Two methods of data collection were used; surveys and autoethnography. The triangulation of methods generated a holistic view of the problem. The study examined how faculty engages in student retention through a target population survey. My personal involvement in a four years colleges and a PHD program was included in the study and variables were presented through autoethnography methodology. The dissertation answered the question “What does faculty perceives that they and the college can do to increase student retention?” The study centered on the need to improve faculty’s involvement in student retention. The combination of survey and autoethnographic information provided sufficient evidence that student attrition has not been implemented into the character of the college. Faculty at the college overwhelmingly agrees that the college has a very low culture value rating concerning faculty and student interactions.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Bonner, Malcolm
Commitee: Harper, Brodrick, Henderson, Lenneal, Mahon, Lee
School: Fielding Graduate University
Department: The School of Educational Leadership and Change
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-A 73/05, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Community college education, Educational leadership
Keywords: Attrition, College attrition, College retention, Student retention
Publication Number: 3491136
ISBN: 9781267128522
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest