Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

A phenomenological study on the effect of supported employment on individuals diagnosed with bipolar disorder
by Ifoezeh, Chinedu Malcolm, Ph.D., Capella University, 2011, 119; 3489794
Abstract (Summary)

The following research was conducted with the intent to understand the meanings adult diagnosed with bipolar disorder attribute to their experiences in a supported employment program. Exploration of these experiences utilizing Adult Learning Theory helped discover to what extent employment helps in the management and recovery of mental illness. Fourteen individuals with bipolar disorder voluntarily participated in this study. This qualitative study utilized a phenomenological approach to fully understand participants' experiences of a supported employment program. The researcher was able to determine the result of the study by the emerging themes of the participants' personal accounts during a face to face semi-structured interview with the researcher. The researcher recorded interviews with an audio recorder and transcribed them into text using ATLAS.ti Qualitative Data Analysis 6.2 Software. These participants found meanings from their experiences in a supported employment program. These meanings manifested as the emerging themes of the study: accommodation, socializations, inclusion and most of all, security. Findings indicated that supported employment program helps people with Bipolar Disorder. In addition, these findings added to current literature in the human service field will provide a better understanding of how employment contributes to the management of mental illness.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: JOHNSON, KIT
Commitee: BAKER, EDWARD, BUNDY, RUTH
School: Capella University
Department: School of Public Service Leadership
School Location: United States -- Minnesota
Source: DAI-B 73/04, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Clinical psychology, Occupational psychology
Keywords: Adult learning theory, Bipolar disorder, Disability, Mental illness, Social security income, Supported employment
Publication Number: 3489794
ISBN: 9781267094339