Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The effects of fluency-based autism training on emerging educational leaders
by Barbera, Mary Lynch, Ph.D., Alvernia University, 2011, 173; 3485048
Abstract (Summary)

A substantial increase in the number of children being diagnosed with autism within the past decade has greatly expanded the need for qualified individuals to serve as therapists, teachers, and aides for these students. Leaders in corporate, community, and educational organizations are having a difficult time meeting the diverse training needs of students, parents, and staff. A servant-operant leadership approach provided a framework for the study. Using a quasi-experimental design, this study evaluated the effects of a fluency-based procedure used to train emerging educational leaders on one component needed when using the verbal behavior approach to teach children with autism. This study included a multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) that compared treatments with and without fluency procedures and determined if fluency-based procedures improved skill acquisition, application, written retention, and oral retention. Thirty-nine graduate education students completed the study with slightly more than half of the group receiving fluency training from the researcher. Results of the study indicated that participants in the experimental group learned, applied, and retained information significantly better than the control group. Discussion on the importance of leaders evaluating training and education programs and a call for future research on fluency-based training procedures are presented.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Ballantyne, Scott
Commitee:
School: Alvernia University
School Location: United States -- Pennsylvania
Source: DAI-A 73/02, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Behavioral psychology, Educational leadership, Special education
Keywords: Autism, Training programs, Verbal behavior
Publication Number: 3485048
ISBN: 9781267014511
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