Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Effects of body image on maternal depression and cortisol levels during pregnancy
by Smallwood, Nina A., M.A., California State University, Long Beach, 2011, 88; 1499305
Abstract (Summary)

Depression and abnormal cortisol patterns during pregnancy have been shown to have negative health outcomes for both mothers and their infants. However, no studies have investigated whether dimensions of body image are associated with depressive symptoms or cortisol among ethnic minority women during pregnancy. The current study examined whether dimensions of body image during pregnancy were associated with prenatal depression levels (CES-D) and salivary cortisol patterns. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that women who were more optimistic about their pregnancy weight gain had significantly greater depression levels (R2=.44, p<.001). Results also showed that women who had more negative beliefs about pregnancy beauty had significantly higher cortisol reactivity. Additionally, the same model showed that women who experienced more positive feelings as a result of comments that others made about their appearance had significantly higher cortisol reactivity (R 2=.57, p<.01).

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Urizar, Guido G., Jr.
Commitee:
School: California State University, Long Beach
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 50/01M, Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Clinical psychology, Physiological psychology
Keywords:
Publication Number: 1499305
ISBN: 978-1-124-85803-6
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