Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Development of the Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Myalgic Encephalomyelitis Stigma (CFSMES) Scale
by Jantke, Rachel L., M.A., Roosevelt University, 2011, 65; 1497816
Abstract (Summary)

The purpose of the present study was to create a scale that measures stigma toward individuals with CFS, the Chronic Fatigue Stigma and Myalgic Encephalomyelitis Stigma (CFSMES) Scale, and to assess the scale's reliability and validity. A total of 138 participants voluntarily participated in this study. The formation of the scale items was guided by the six dimensions of stigma identified by Jones et al. (1984). This scale captures the prominent qualities of CFS and people's attitudes towards individuals with CFS. Principle axis factoring was the extraction method used to identify and compute composite scores for the factors underlying the CFSMES scale. Factor analysis was used to investigate whether the attitudes measured by the CFSMES scale are multidimensional as developed and to identify which individual CFSMES scale items measured the same dimensions. The varimax rotation produced five factors, each of which met the criteria above. The results showed that the CFSMES scale has 5 factors: Negative Perception (8 items), Concealability (5 items), Relationship (4 items), Treatment (4 items), and Course (3 items). The creation of the CFSMES scale is beneficial in that it can lead to a better understanding of whether stigma in CFS is similar to stigma experienced in other types of illness.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Torres-Harding, Susan
Commitee: Campbell, Catherine
School: Roosevelt University
Department: Clinical Psychology
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: MAI 50/01M, Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Clinical psychology, Quantitative psychology
Keywords: CFS, Chronic, Fatigue, Myalgic, Scale, Stigma
Publication Number: 1497816
ISBN: 9781124829517
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