Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Artificial and natural nucleic acid self-assembling systems
by Wood, Marcus, Ph.D., Wayne State University, 2011, 143; 3466688
Abstract (Summary)

Nucleic acids are good candidates for nanomachine construction. They participate in all the processes of life, and so can function as structural building blocks and dynamic catalysts. However, to use nucleic acids as nanomachines, a better understanding of their material properties, how to design structures using them, and their dynamics is needed. We have tried to address these issues, in a small way, with nucleic acid force field development, an attempt at nanostructural design and synthesis using DNA, and a study of the RNA/protein regulatory dynamics of the tryptophan regulatory attenuation protein.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: SantaLucia, John, Jr., Rueda, David
Commitee: Chernyak, Vladimir, Cunningham, Philip, Poole, Colin
School: Wayne State University
Department: Chemistry
School Location: United States -- Michigan
Source: DAI-B 72/10, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Biochemistry, Biomedical engineering, Nanotechnology
Keywords: DNA, Force field development, Nanotechnology, Nucleic acids, RNA, Tryptophan regulation
Publication Number: 3466688
ISBN: 978-1-124-80293-0
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest