Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Topics in intellectual property
by Malaspina, Peter Adam, Ph.D., The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2011, 80; 3465043
Abstract (Summary)

The following chapters cover theoretical and empirical investigations into issues of intellectual property.

The first chapter examines predatory behavior in patent litigation. I develop a signaling model where the timing of litigation against an initial act of infringement transmits noisy signals about a patent holder's private expectations of litigation awards. I find a non-monotonic relationship between a patent holder's award expectation and the timing of litigation. Patent holders with sufficiently high award expectations will exhibit predatory behavior by delaying litigation to lure infringers. At the same time, patent holders with moderate award expectations will litigate quickly to deter additional acts of infringement.

The second chapter (co-authored with Dr. David Molin) examines the economic consequences of the reduction in the fixed costs of distribution due to the emergence of the Internet and information technology. Others have examined the effects of increasing product variety on consumer welfare, in bookselling and in other markets. We identify a set of books sold on Amazon.com for which the author's revenue can be computed. We use this data to parameterize a model of author entry and then estimate the welfare gains of authors and consumers from Print-on-Demand (POD) technology.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Norman, Peter
Commitee: Biglaiser, Gary, McManus, Brian, Parreiras, Sergio, Tauchen, Helen
School: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Department: Economics
School Location: United States -- North Carolina
Source: DAI-A 72/10, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Economic theory, Intellectual Property
Keywords: Fixed distribution costs, Patent litigation, Print-on-demand technology
Publication Number: 3465043
ISBN: 9781124767123
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