Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Career college student success definitions and academic needs after illicit drug use: A narrative study
by Landin, Jeanette Marie, Ed.D., University of Phoenix, 2011, 196; 3463544
Abstract (Summary)

Many college students have a history of illicit drug use. The purpose of this qualitative narrative inquiry study was to explore the individualized definitions of academic success among career college students with a history of illicit drug use. An exploration of participants’ perceptions of the effects of illicit drugs on their learning and individual educational experiences yielded ideas about student success definitions and needs. Data gathered through participant essays revealed individual experiences and common themes. Findings of this qualitative study included perceptions among participants that learning and cognitive abilities may have been compromised by their illicit drug use. Wavering self-confidence and determination about success potential were reported. Participants cited both internal and external achievements as the hallmarks of their success, including high grades, graduation, internal gratification, and sometimes simply finishing what they started. Suggestions for educational practice and leadership and a model of fulfilling the needs of academic success for students with a history of illicit drug use are included.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: McDonald, Cathryn A.
Commitee:
School: University of Phoenix
School Location: United States -- Arizona
Source: DAI-A 72/09, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Community college education, Adult education, Developmental psychology, Higher education
Keywords: Academic success, Career college, Drug use, Illicit drug use, Student perceptions
Publication Number: 3463544
ISBN: 9781124760728
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