Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Interaction of technological innovation and generational diversity in the view of organizational excellence and success
by Lee, Lydia Lam, D.M., University of Phoenix, 2011, 298; 3463545
Abstract (Summary)

This qualitative grounded theory explored the interaction of technological innovation and generational diversity in the governmental workforce of the U.S. aerospace industry. Twenty one employees of National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) provided their perspectives on the basic grounding organizational factors of multiple facets of human behaviors and various perceived values due to generational diversity affecting cross-departmental knowledge sharing on the significance of creating an innovative organization. The findings distinguished the divergence and convergence of implications on the innovation across departments due to the variations in behaviors and perspectives of employees belonging to different age groups and justified the interaction of technological innovation and generational diversity as a competitive advantage for the U.S. aerospace industry. The findings may assist in bridging the break in maintaining competitive advantage of the U.S. governmental aerospace organizations by understanding different perspectives and behaviors of generational diversity and by leveraging the value of technological innovation.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Ball, Stephen Reid
Commitee:
School: University of Phoenix
School Location: United States -- Arizona
Source: DAI-A 72/09, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Management, Occupational psychology, Organization Theory, Organizational behavior
Keywords: Diversity as human behaviors, Diversity in NASA organization, Diversity in the U.S. aerospace industry, Diversity in the governmental workforce, Generational diversity, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Technological innovation
Publication Number: 3463545
ISBN: 9781124761220
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