Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Assessment of nurses' knowledge when screening women for intimate partner violence
by Kruetzkamp, Ashel, M.S.N., Northern Kentucky University, 2011, 47; 1493992
Abstract (Summary)

Annually women experience 4.8 million physical assaults and rapes. This kind of abuse cost billions of dollars yearly in medical care expenses, mental health, and lost productivity. Nurses are in the position to improve identification of intimate partner violence (IPV) since patients seek health care in the hospital setting. Lack of nurse education and knowledge are two of the most identified barriers in screening for IPV (Ellis, 1999, Hegge & Condon, 1996; Hetzel, 2004; Jezierski, 2002; Power, 2004; and Ralph 2000). This study involved surveying 89 nurses who work in the emergency department, transitional care, and labor and delivery units in a large suburban hospital. The PI conducted a quantitative descriptive study following Orlando's theory of The Dynamic Nurse-Patient Relationship. A survey consisted of twenty true and false questions to assess nurses' knowledge of abused women, nurses' assessment knowledge of IPV, and nurses' knowledge of women's general health in IPV. This study indicates that areas of concentration should focus on women's general health in IPV. An overwhelming, 75% percent of nurses feel more IPV education or in-services are needed. This study provided the advanced nurse educator the necessary information needed to develop an educational offering for those who work in healthcare areas to be able to identify patients who are victims of IPV.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Mutsch, Karen
Commitee: Vietor, Theresa
School: Northern Kentucky University
Department: Nursing
School Location: United States -- Kentucky
Source: MAI 49/06M, Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Social work, Nursing
Keywords: Abuse women, Assessment, Domestic violence, Intimate partner violence, Knowlege, Screening
Publication Number: 1493992
ISBN: 978-1-124-67750-7
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