Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The effect of adult sportsmanship and pro-social behavior modeling on child self-competence in youth football programs
by Wilson, Bryan Scott, M.A., Gonzaga University, 2011, 62; 1492740
Abstract (Summary)

Youth sports are viewed as a prime venue for teaching social values and life skills. By virtue of their organizing and leadership positions, adults play a critical role in communicating these lessons. Although there is little debate on the criticality of positive sportsmanship, there has been a serious trend in increasingly unsportsmanlike behaviors at youth events. In response, many organizations have implemented programs designed to increase positive adult sportsmanship communications and pro-social behaviors. While studies have shown that training does result in increased sportsmanship, less information is available on the impacts of such programs beyond increasing the “fun factor.” This study explores the connection between adult education programs and youth participant self-competence. A total of 160 children, ages 8 to 11, from two comparable youth football leagues completed a self-competence assessment following their 2010 season. The study’s primary dependent variable was the presence or lack of a league sponsored adult training program. The results indicate that the presence of adult education programs is likely to have a significant effect on the self-competence levels of participants, and highlight the value of continued implementation of such programs.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Inagaki, Nobuya, Crandall, Heather
Commitee:
School: Gonzaga University
Department: Communication and Leadership
School Location: United States -- Washington
Source: MAI 49/06M, Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Social research, Communication
Keywords: Pro-social, Self-competence, Sportsmanship, Youth sports
Publication Number: 1492740
ISBN: 978-1-124-65211-5
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