Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Negotiating the non-narrative, aesthetic and erotic in New Extreme Gore
by Weissenstein, Colva, M.A., Georgetown University, 2011, 128; 1491589
Abstract (Summary)

This thesis is about the economic and aesthetic elements of New Extreme Gore films produced in the 2000s. The thesis seeks to evaluate film in terms of its aesthetic project rather than a traditional reading of horror as a cathartic genre. The aesthetic project of these films manifests in terms of an erotic and visually constructed affective experience. It examines the films from a thick descriptive and scene analysis methodology in order to express the aesthetic over narrative elements of the films. The thesis is organized in terms of the economic location of the New Extreme Gore films in terms of the film industry at large. It then negotiates a move to define and analyze the aesthetic and stylistic elements of the images of bodily destruction and gore present in these productions. Finally, to consider the erotic manifestations of New Extreme Gore it explores the relationship between the real and the artificial in horror and hardcore pornography. New Extreme Gore operates in terms of a kind of aesthetic, gore-driven pornography. Further, the films in question are inherently tied to their economic circumstances as a result of the significant visual effects technology and the unstable financial success of hyper-violent films. The method of the thesis seeks to explore the relationship between language, cinema as a visual form and the elements of the inexpressible that appear in the scenes of torture.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: LeMasters, Garrison
Commitee: Irvine, Martin
School: Georgetown University
Department: Communication, Culture & Technology
School Location: United States -- District of Columbia
Source: MAI 49/05M, Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Film studies
Keywords: Aesthetics, Gore, Horror, Porn, Saw, Torture
Publication Number: 1491589
ISBN: 9781124603261
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