Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Parental involvement in middle school mathematics
by Hallstrom, Ligia Varela, Ed.D., Pepperdine University, 2011, 241; 3449974
Abstract (Summary)

This study evaluated the impact of the Teachers Involve Parents in Schoolwork (TIPS) program developed by the National Network of Partnership Schools. Data collection methods included session pre-and post-assessments of parents, structured parent journal questions, a parent focus group, and researcher field notes.

A purposeful sample of parents was selected from 105 students enrolled in pre-algebra at a lower-class primarily Hispanic middle school in Southern California. All of these parents—27 parents of 23 of these low-achieving students—were invited and agreed to participate after an initial recruitment and orientation meeting. Meetings days and time were selected based upon teacher and parent availability.

The findings from parents’ reports after the 10 TIPS sessions indicated that having the parent participate in these structured workshops with their child was beneficial for several reasons: (a) changed their cultural norm of limited communication with their child’s teacher, (b) increased support for their child’s progress and how to respond to their child at home with homework, (c) increased interaction and communication with their child about school and homework, and (d) increased understanding of what their child was learning. Ninety-two percent indicated that they were more knowledgeable and confident on how to support their child with homework and that their degree of involvement changed after the workshops. Instead of using only the student agenda as their ways to communicate with the school, they reported that they attended teacher conferences and called the teacher. Ninety-two percent used other resources, 72% of the parents sat next to their child while doing homework and 60% read to their child even if it was difficult for them to understand English. However, 92% also wanted additional work regarding homework and how to be more active in their child’s education.

Initially, the researcher prepared and then parents volunteered meals, accepting responsibility for the program. Across the sessions, parents bonded as a group, changed their participation in school homework, and reported that the TIPS program provided communication tools that empowered them to step out of their own traditional cultural role and norm to advocate for their child’s education.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Hiatt-Michael, Diana
Commitee: Barner, Robert, Bonsangue, Marty
School: Pepperdine University
Department: Education
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-A 72/06, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Mathematics education, Middle School education, Curriculum development
Keywords: Mathematics, Middle school, Parent involvement
Publication Number: 3449974
ISBN: 978-1-124-57950-4
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