Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Impact of the care transitions ProgramSM on caregiver preparedness and confidence
by Weir, Melanie, M.S., California State University, Long Beach, 2010, 93; 1490427
Abstract (Summary)

The purpose of this study was to examine whether an intervention designed to improve care transitions for patients would also have an impact on caregivers' sense of preparedness and confidence for providing post-hospital care. The intervention consists of a series of four or five phone calls conducted by a Care Transitions Coach, whose role is to encourage self-management, and help improve communications with providers.

Forty-two caregivers were interviewed at two different points in time, initially upon completion of the Care Transitions Intervention and again 30 days later. Caregivers frequently agreed or strongly agreed with statements encompassing confidence and preparedness in managing tasks under the five domains addressed by the intervention (medication self-management, use of a patient-centered record, follow-up medical care, knowledge of warning signs and symptoms, and empowerment to assert preferences). This indicates that the Care Transitions Intervention may positively influence caregiver preparedness and confidence in providing post-hospital care, and that this effect may be sustained over time. This study did not find significant differences between the mean scores of male and female caregivers, or between older and younger caregivers, nor was a significant correlation found between the care recipient's level of function and the caregiver's preparedness and confidence. Additionally, while a significant difference was not established between caregiver self-rated health and caregiver preparedness and confidence, results were very close at p = .051. Therefore, a correlation may exist.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Whik, Barbara
Commitee:
School: California State University, Long Beach
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 49/04M, Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Gerontology
Keywords:
Publication Number: 1490427
ISBN: 9781124550411
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