Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Resistance to Change: Implications of Individual Differences In Expression of Resistance to Change
by Schiffer, Eileen Franzese, Ph.D., University of South Florida, 2011, 122; 3443923
Abstract (Summary)

Resistance to change has for decades been recognized as an organizational challenge; however, a comprehensive understanding of the different ways that resistance can be manifested was still needed. If individuals respond to change in different ways, and if variations in responses yield different outcomes, recognition of those expressions of resistance is an essential step in the development and implementation of effective, targeted change management strategies. This study refined the conceptualization of the resistance to change construct as a maladaptive response to change, and demonstrated through multiple iterations of scale validation that it is a multi-faceted construct, comprised of internal (both cognitive and affective), physical, and behavioral manifestations of resistance. The resulting Resistance Responses Scale (RRS) predicted employees' perceptions of their leaders, their social networks and of available change information, all variables which can impact the success of organizational change efforts. Use of the RRS can increase employers' understanding of their employees' responses to change, and facilitate development of appropriate change management strategies.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Nelson, Carnot
Commitee: Bosson, Jennifer, Brannick, Michael, Phares, Vicky, Stark, Stephen
School: University of South Florida
Department: Psychology
School Location: United States -- Florida
Source: DAI-A 72/05, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Management, Occupational psychology, Organizational behavior
Keywords: Behavioral, Change resistance, Internal processing, Maladaptive, Manifestations, Physical, Response scale
Publication Number: 3443923
ISBN: 9781124505732
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