Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Framing Of The Mumbai Terror Attacks By The Indian and The Pakistani Print Media
by Raina, Pamposh, M.A., The George Washington University, 2011, 80; 1489046
Abstract (Summary)

Political communication scholars argue that language and images are often used to highlight only certain aspects of a social or political reality. This is the reality that the political elites of a nation want their public to believe so that they can further their own political agenda. Due to the existing routines of newsgathering in the profession of journalism, journalists often find themselves echoing the same issues as the political elites, thus consciously or unconsciously aiding their political agenda. Consequently the public is only exposed to selected slices of reality and only that “reality” resonates with them. In this study I explore how the print media in India and Pakistan covered the Mumbai terror attacks of November 2008; to find out whether the print media in each country may have constructed an enemy narrative while reporting the terror attacks and whether the sources used to construct the narrative were the political elites of India and Pakistan. Since the news media play a central role in shaping public perception, if the enemy narrative did dominate the media coverage it might have accentuated the negative perception that each side has of the other. This could impact the renegotiation of peace talks between the two nuclear-armed neighbors and thus impede the peace process.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Waisbord, Silvio
Commitee: Entman, Robert M., Phalen, Patricia F.
School: The George Washington University
Department: Media and Public Affairs
School Location: United States -- District of Columbia
Source: MAI 49/04M, Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: South Asian Studies, Mass communications
Keywords: India
Publication Number: 1489046
ISBN: 9781124481227
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest