Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Leadership, Emotional Intelligence, and Quality Care in Long-Term Care Facilities
by Marotta, Joya, D.H.A., University of Phoenix, 2010, 168; 3441253
Abstract (Summary)

As the population ages and the need for skilled nursing and rehabilitative services grows, the demands and expectations of consumers will continue to cultivate. The quality of patient care within skilled nursing facilities will continue to be a concern as long as the lack of leadership remains a barrier to providing quality care. The purpose of the quantitative correlational study was to determine whether a relationship exists among transformational leadership characteristics and emotional intelligence levels of nursing home administrators (NHAs) and directors of nursing (DONs) and quality care outcomes within a skilled nursing facility environment. The sample consisted of 173 nursing home administrators and 95 directors of nursing employed by a multi-facility organization located throughout the United States of America. The analyses of data provided descriptive and inferential statistics. The results of the current research revealed that no statistically significant relationship existed between leadership characteristics, emotional intelligence ability of a group of NHAs and DONs, and quality patient care. Future research recommendations should include participation from all skilled nursing facilities throughout the United States.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Bostain, Nancy S.
Commitee:
School: University of Phoenix
School Location: United States -- Arizona
Source: DAI-B 72/03, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Gerontology, Aging, Health care management
Keywords: Emotional intelligence, Long-term care, Nursing homes
Publication Number: 3441253
ISBN: 9781124445205
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