Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Relationship of role overload to job satisfaction and intent to leave among acute care nurses
by Morter, Judy R., Ed.D., University of Phoenix, 2010, 165; 3438410
Abstract (Summary)

The global nursing shortage is predicted to worsen and is threatening the health care of all people in the United States. Nurses are the largest employee cohort in hospitals and provide the majority of direct patient care at the bedside. Retaining nurses in hospitals must be a priority for nursing leadership. The purpose of this quantitative correlational research was to study the relationship of role overload to job satisfaction and intent to leave of registered nurses in acute care settings. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire, which included five instruments and the demographic form. Descriptive statistics, correlational analysis, and multiple regressions were used to analyze the data. The research indicated significant correlation between role overload and two job satisfaction facets (job satisfaction with scheduling and job satisfaction with work–family balance), a significant correlation between role overload and intent to leave, and a significant correlation between role overload and level of education in nursing. Results indicated the importance of RNs’ perception of role overload and the need for further research to determine other factors related to role overload and intent to leave of RNs in the acute care setting.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Christopher, John
Commitee:
School: University of Phoenix
School Location: United States -- Arizona
Source: DAI-B 72/02, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Nursing, Organizational behavior
Keywords: Acute care nurses, Intent to leave, Job satisfaction
Publication Number: 3438410
ISBN: 9781124415925
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