Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Creating connectedness in middle school: An applied study in the relationship between team teaching model and school connectedness
by Bones, Geoffrey, Psy.D., Alfred University, 2010, 74; 3432687
Abstract (Summary)

School Connectedness is a student’s general sense of being supported and accepted by peers and adults in a school, as well as a sense of commitment, engagement, and belonging to the school institution. This variable has been linked to a variety of positive academic and social outcomes. Researchers have identified several dimensions of SC, but evidence suggests the teacher-student relationship may have the greatest impact on student outcomes. Few researchers have studied the impact of different interventions on this specific domain of school connectedness. The current study focuses on the relationship between team teaching configuration and the teacher-student relationship domain of SC. An independent samples design was utilized with a population of 6th grade students at a suburban middle school. One sample of students was taken from a two-teacher team, and a second sample was taken from a four-teacher team. Results showed that students on the two-teacher team reported significantly higher levels of SC than their counterparts on the four-teacher team. In addition, the evidence suggests that there is a likely interaction effect between team teaching configuration and gender on student levels of SC.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Gaughan, Edward
Commitee: Greil, Arthur L., Lauback, Cris W.
School: Alfred University
Department: Division of Counseling and School Psychology
School Location: United States -- New York
Source: DAI-B 72/02, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Middle School education, Social psychology, Educational psychology
Keywords: Connectedness, Middle, Middle school, School, Teaching, Team, Team teaching
Publication Number: 3432687
ISBN: 9781124375854
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