Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Drawn toward India: Okakurō Kakuzō's interpretation of Rájendralála Mitra's work in his construction of Pan-Asianism and the history of Japanese art
by Ninomiya-Igarashi, Masumi, Ph.D., The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2010, 201; 3428390
Abstract (Summary)

The contribution of Okakura Kakuzo (also known by the pseudonym Tenshin, 1863-1913) to the development of both Japanese art and the writing of its history has been the subject of prolific scholarly re-evaluation from the mid-twentieth century into the present. This study contributes to the growing literature by examining a specific aspect of Okakura's understanding of Indian art and architecture, and its role in his conceptualization of Pan-Asianism and the shaping of Japanese national identity through art. I complicate the scholarly dialogue by introducing Okakura's reading of the pioneering Bengali scholar Rajendralala Mitra (1822-1891), who had been hailed by the subsequent generation of Indian nationalist intellectuals as the first Indian art historian. I suggest that Okakura and his Indian compatriots embraced Rajendralala Mitra's astute political deployment of his scholarly work as a role model in their effort to define nationalist ideals in their particular political contexts in early twentieth-century Japan and India.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Ghosh, Pika
Commitee: Abe, Stanley K., Fletcher, W. Miles, Lin, Wei-Cheng, Sheriff, Mary D.
School: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Department: Art History
School Location: United States -- North Carolina
Source: DAI-A 72/01, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Asian Studies, Art history
Keywords: Indian art, Japan, Japanese art history, Mitra, Rajendralala, Raja, Okakura, Kakuzo, Pan-Asianism, Yokoyama, Taikan
Publication Number: 3428390
ISBN: 9781124349954
Copyright © 2018 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest