Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Sibling-implemented intervention for improving social interaction skills of young children who have difficulties with socialization
by Kim, Taeyoung, Ed.D., University of Kansas, 2010, 156; 3427247
Abstract (Summary)

The purpose of this study is to assess the potential of siblings as an important intervention agent by systematically teaching them appropriate social skills and strategies in order to improve the social interaction skills of their siblings who have difficulties with socializations. Three sibling and child dyads and each of their parents participated in the study. Using a single-subject, multiple baseline design across the sibling and child dyads, social behaviors of the siblings and the children were measured to investigate the effects of the sibling-implemented intervention. The siblings were taught some specific social skills and strategies in the intervention. After the intervention, both siblings and children with disabilities demonstrated positive changes in their play engagement and social interaction. Results of the study indicate that the siblings were able to learn and use specific social skills and strategies in interacting with their siblings with disabilities resulting in positive impact on their siblings with disabilities' social interactions. Finally, summary of the findings, limitations of the study, implications for research and practice are discussed.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Horn, Eva
Commitee: Carta, Judith, Greenwood, Charles, Thompson, Barbara, Turnbull, Ann
School: University of Kansas
Department: Special Education
School Location: United States -- Kansas
Source: DAI-A 71/12, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Special education
Keywords: Disabilities, Sibling-implemented intervention, Single-case multiple design, Social interaction, Social interaction skills, Young children with disabilities
Publication Number: 3427247
ISBN: 9781124310039
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