Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Academic freedom: A history of the academy's legitimating concept
by Kish, Kelly A., Ph.D., Indiana University, 2010, 361; 3423689
Abstract (Summary)

Academic freedom is widely accepted as the legitimating concept which separates the academic profession from other professions. Over the last fifty years the dramatic changes in American higher education—from enrollment growth, shifts in funding sources, disciplinary specialization and diversification of institutional missions—have each influenced how academic freedom is actualized on college and university campuses. This study traces the history of academic freedom in American higher education from the late 1950s through the present. It asks about the current status and conceptions of academic freedom in American higher education, it considers what has shaped and influenced the current status and conceptions of American higher education, and it seeks to illuminate how the present state of professional autonomy is better understood through historical discussions of academic freedom. An organizational taxonomy is presented to explain the complexities of the domains, agents, and threats to academic freedom. The analysis revealed that a volatile, but nevertheless still identifiable, state of academic freedom existed throughout this tumultuous period. Because of this constant state of challenge and tension, the autonomy of the professoriate, and therefore the autonomy of higher education, has suffered.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Walton, Andrea
Commitee: Bean, John, Carter, Deborah Faye, McClellan, B. Edward
School: Indiana University
Department: School of Education
School Location: United States -- Indiana
Source: DAI-A 71/11, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Education history, Higher education
Keywords: Academic freedom, Higher education, History, Legitimation, Professional autonomy
Publication Number: 3423689
ISBN: 9781124247373
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