Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Framing a program designed to train new chemistry/physics teachers for California outlying regions
by Bodily, Gerald P., Jr., Ed.D., University of California, Davis, 2010, 149; 3422768
Abstract (Summary)

The purpose of this study was to develop guidelines for a new high school chemistry and physics teacher training program. Eleven participants were interviewed who attended daylong workshops, every other Saturday, for 10 months. The instructors used Modeling Instruction pedagogy and curriculum. All the instructors had high school teaching experience, but only one possessed a doctorate degree. The interview questions focused on four themes: motivation, epistemology, meta-cognition, and self-regulation; and the resulting transcripts were analyzed using a methodology called Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis. The cases expressed a strong preference for the program's instruction program over learning subject matter knowledge in university classrooms. The data indicated that the cases, as a group, were disciplined scholars seeking a deep understanding of the subject matter knowledge needed to teach high school chemistry and physics. Based on these results a new approach to training teachers was proposed, an approach that offers novel answers to the questions of how and who to train as science teachers. The how part of the training involves using a program called Modeling Instruction. Modeling instruction is currently used to upgrade experienced science teachers and, in the new approach, replaces the training traditionally administered by professional scientists in university science departments. The who aspect proposes that the participants be college graduates, selected not for university science training, but for their high school math and science background. It is further proposed that only 10 months of daily, face-to-face instruction is required to move the learner to a deep understanding of subject matter knowledge required to teach high school chemistry and physics. Two outcomes are sought by employing this new training paradigm, outcomes that have been unachievable by current educational practices. First, it is hoped that new chemistry and physics teachers can exit their subject-matter training with a deep understanding of the subject-matter knowledge needed for the high school chemistry/physics classroom. Secondly, it is hoped that the number of talented teachers can match the need.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Tracz, Susan
Commitee: Brown-Welty, Sharon, Marshall, James, McNeal, John
School: University of California, Davis
Department: Educational Leadership
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-A 71/11, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Teacher education, Secondary education, Science education
Keywords: California, Chemistry teacher, Modeling instruction, Physics teacher, Preservice teachers, Teacher training
Publication Number: 3422768
ISBN: 9781124223780
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest