Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Giving voice to reluctant learners: An exploratory study
by Pringle, Mark T., Ed.D., University of Rochester, 2010, 78; 3421830
Abstract (Summary)

The purpose of this exploratory study is to hear from reluctant learners about their perceptions of their experiences in middle school and the meanings they make from these. This study will give voice to students, a stakeholder group that has been traditionally silent in the literature on K-12 learning and achievement. Capturing the perceptions students referred to as reluctant learners have about middle school and the meanings such students make of their perceptions and experiences can inform school officials about how these individuals experience and report interactions at school. The researcher conducted a qualitative design based on research principles and practices from symbolic interactionism. Individual interviews were conducted with eight middle school students who were identified as reluctant learners by designees of the building principal. Results challenge the belief that these students lack motivation and interest. These students indicate a sense of powerlessness when at school, lack of skills necessary to realize success in school, and that student relationships with their teachers may affect their level of engagement and work production. It is hoped that a better understanding in educators of the way things appear to these students will heighten awareness, create dialogue, and thus lead to improvements in education practice.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Mackie, Karen
Commitee:
School: University of Rochester
School Location: United States -- New York
Source: DAI-A 71/10, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Middle School education, Social psychology, School counseling, Educational psychology
Keywords: Adolescents, Disengaged, Middle school, Qualitative, Reluctant, Reluctant learners, Voice
Publication Number: 3421830
ISBN: 9781124221960
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