Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The impact of culture on the MCMI-III scores of African American and Caribbean Blacks
by Lloyd, Althea M., Ph.D., Nova Southeastern University, 2009, 107; 3409992
Abstract (Summary)

The Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-Third Edition (MCMI-III) currently ranks among the most commonly utilized personality tools. A review of the literature revealed that ethnic minorities tend to score higher on certain scales of the MMPI and MCMI compared to their White counterparts. The literature also indicated that acculturation level can serve as a moderator variable on overall performance on these measures. Most of the studies that examined racial/ethnic differences on the MCMI were conducted using the MCMI-I and MCMI-II. While many MCMI studies have explored racial differences, few studies have examined the impact of cultural factors on MCMI-III performance. To date, there is no empirical data on the impact of culture on the MCMI-III scores of Blacks from different cultural backgrounds. Given the significant increase in the number of Black immigrants to the United States especially from the Caribbean and Africa, Black Americans are becoming an even more diverse group, representing different cultures and nationalities.

In the current study, the performance of African Americans (n = 52) and Caribbean Blacks (n = 77) were compared on the Antisocial, Narcissistic, Paranoid, and Delusional Disorder scales of the MCMI-III. Attempts were also made to compare Blacks in the current sample to the MCMI-III’s development sample. Additionally, the impact of cultural variables was examined using the African American Acculturation Scaled-Revised (AAAS-R). Multivariate Analysis of Variance procedure revealed no significant difference in performance between the two groups on the select scales of the MCMI-III (p =.883). Additional analyses revealed significant difference between the two groups on the Compulsive scale: Caribbean Blacks obtained a higher mean (Cohen’s d =.-50. F = 6.663, p = .011).

Analyses comparing the Blacks in the current sample to the MCMI-III’s development sample indicated the following: (a) a significant difference between the two groups on the Antisocial, Narcissistic, and Delusional Disorder Scales and (b) no significant difference between the two groups on the Paranoid scale (p = .559). Supplemental analysis revealed moderate association between the Paranoid and Delusional Disorder Scales of the MCMI-III and certain scales of the AAAS-R, implying both a degree of item overlap and similar item content.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Lewis, John
Commitee: Campbell, Stephen, Marker, Craig
School: Nova Southeastern University
Department: Psychology
School Location: United States -- Florida
Source: DAI-B 71/08, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: African American Studies, Black studies, Caribbean Studies, Clinical psychology, Personality psychology
Keywords: African-American, Caribbean Blacks, Culture, MCMI-III, Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-Third Edition
Publication Number: 3409992
ISBN: 978-1-124-07942-4
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