Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

U.S. ethics and global effects: Public radio's struggle to cover climate change for a consumer audience
by Harris, Sara R., M.A., University of Southern California, 2010, 63; 1476257
Abstract (Summary)

An international consensus of scientists projects that poor people around the world will be disproportionately affected by climate change. More than half of the world population lives in poverty and lacks the means to adapt to the adverse effects of a warming planet. Climate change brings with it some of the most complicated ethical issues of environmental justice that the world has faced to date. The United States emits more heat-trapping gasses per capita than any other nation. Much of those emissions are byproducts of individualized transportation and of the production of goods consumed in the industrialized world while the effects of those emissions unequally affect less-industrialized populations. Accountability journalism can examine this relationship as a strategy for upsetting this power dynamic. The key to the public in the United States accepting responsibility for climate change lies in people understanding more than the fact of climate change- it lies in understanding the ethical issues involved. In this essay, I offer a lens for those who work in accountability journalism in the United States to consider their role in bridging the gap between public knowing and public caring about the inherent inequalities of climate change.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Suro, Roberto
Commitee: Cole, KC, Sa-Wilhemy, Sergio
School: University of Southern California
Department: Journalism (Specialized Journalism)
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 48/05M, Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Journalism, Ethics, Climate Change
Keywords: Climate change, Environmental justice, Ethics, Global warming, News media, Public broadcasting
Publication Number: 1476257
ISBN: 9781109774443
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