Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Loneliness and high school students receiving Resource Specialist services
by Medearis, Lindsey L., M.A., California State University, Long Beach, 2009, 90; 1472236
Abstract (Summary)

Obtaining perspectives from students with mild disabilities regarding the self-perception of loneliness is relevant because these students are more at risk for negative outcomes than same age peers without disabilities. Ninth and 10th grade high school students receiving Resource Specialist (RSP) services were interviewed using the Adolescent Interview Protocol adapted from Pavri and Monda-Amaya to address questions regarding how students with mild disabilities describe their experiences with loneliness, factors contributing to feelings of loneliness and their reactions to these experiences. Questions were also developed to examine how students perceive school staff and family in alleviating feelings of loneliness or intervening in decreasing experiences that may lead to feelings of loneliness. The Children's Loneliness Scale was used to classify students according to severity of perceived loneliness. Most participants indicated that school staff should encourage students to discuss their feelings and/or help students problem solve. Findings from this study have implications for creating interventions and ultimately, school climates most effective in alleviating loneliness and ensuring all students have positive social experiences.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Pavri, Shireen
Commitee:
School: California State University, Long Beach
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 48/02M, Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational psychology
Keywords:
Publication Number: 1472236
ISBN: 9781109474220
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