Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Effects of dedicated academic support services on the persistence rates of California Community College student-athletes
by Thiss, Patrick J., Ph.D., Northcentral University, 2009, 174; 3351837
Abstract (Summary)

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) has mandated services be provided to student-athletes to specifically address their unique academic support needs. Many California Community Colleges (CCC) have established varying levels of athlete-specific academic support programs. A survey of CCC athletic administrators was utilized to determine the availability of seven athlete-specific academic support services (Counselor, Advisor, Tutors, Study Skills Course, Orientation Course, Computer Lab, and Study Hall) in CCCs during the academic years of 2004-05, 2005-06, and 2006-07. The efficacy of these services was determined by comparing their availability to the reported athletic persistence of the student-athletes during the three-year period. Eighty-four CCC administrators provided valid responses and each institution's service availability was compared to the reported athletic participation data. Univariate analyses of the data revealed significant associations between Counselor and Advisor with the athletic persistence of the student-athletes in the first inter-year interval. The significant associations found between the availability of athlete-specific academic support services at CCCs and athletic persistence rates tentatively confirms their efficacy.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Haan, Perry
Commitee:
School: Northcentral University
School Location: United States -- Arizona
Source: DAI-A 70/03, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Community college education, Physical education
Keywords: Academic support services, Athletes, Athletics, California, Persistence, Student-athletes
Publication Number: 3351837
ISBN: 9781109083729
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