Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Physician acceptance of Computerized Physician Order Entry in outpatient settings: A quantitative analysis of family medicine within Maricopa County, Arizona
by Noll, Richard T., Ph.D., Capella University, 2009, 133; 3352499
Abstract (Summary)

The relationship between the acceptance of Computerized Physician Order Entry (CPOE) by MD and DO family medicine physicians in Maricopa County, Arizona and physician age, practice size, hours per week of personal computer use, and years of experience working as physician was analyzed. Written invitations were mailed to 1,118 MD and DO family medicine physicians in Maricopa County. Fifty-three (4.74%) physicians participated in the survey. At the .05 level, the acceptance of CPOE as measured by the mean score of the 23 scales of the extended technology acceptance model (TAM2) was found to have no significant relationship between age, practice size, hours per week of personal computer use, and years of experience as a physician. At the .10 level, only the relationship between physician acceptance of CPOE and years of experience was found to be significant. With an increased sample size, the relationship between technology acceptance and factors of age, practice size, personal computer usage, and years of medical practice experience could possibly show to have a significant relationship.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Vucetic, Jelena
Commitee: McCready, Douglas J., Wederski, Lonnie
School: Capella University
Department: School of Business
School Location: United States -- Minnesota
Source: DAI-A 70/04, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Management, Information science
Keywords: Arizona, CPOE, Computerized provider order entry, Electronic healthcare record, Electronic medical record, Family medicine, Maricopa County, Physician, Technology acceptance model
Publication Number: 3352499
ISBN: 9781109102185
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