Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Defining the role of citizens in dialogic environmental risk communication
by Anderson, Holly Lynn, M.A., University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2009, 129; 1469693
Abstract (Summary)

Risk communication has evolved into an interdisciplinary study involving the work of communication specialists, psychologists, attorneys, and rhetoricians. Of particular interest has been the interaction between government and citizens in environmental risk communication. This interaction has been characterized by citizen outrage in response to dictatorial governmental decision-making. In response, researchers have called for true two-way dialogue between government and the public.

This project addresses risk communication during the permitting of hazardous waste management facilities under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, identifying the failure to implement two-way dialogue. The project addresses two concerns: (1) the impact of existing legal barriers, and (2) the strategies necessary to maximize citizen participation. Specific legal barriers to dialogue are identified in the statute and regulations and the limited opportunities actually available for citizen participation are highlighted. Recommendations are then made for citizen communication strategies specific to those opportunities.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: L'eplattenier, Barbara E.
Commitee: Herrmann, Andrea W., Matson, Joanne L.
School: University of Arkansas at Little Rock
Department: Rhetoric and Writing
School Location: United States -- Arkansas
Source: MAI 48/02M, Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Rhetoric, Environmental science
Keywords: Citizens, Hazardous waste, Risk communication, Siting
Publication Number: 1469693
ISBN: 978-1-109-39725-3
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