Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

A qualitative study of the healthcare experiences and health information acquisition of African American men
by Carolina, Demetrius S., Sr., Ed.D., University of Phoenix, 2009, 166; 3384552
Abstract (Summary)

The qualitative research study investigated the unique healthcare-related experiences of African American men within the New York Metropolitan area. Using an open-ended interview methodology, the study investigated how the healthcare experiences of African American men informed their healthcare choices. The study investigated the factors that affect health literacy and health-related behaviors of African American men via an open-ended interview technique. The goal of the study was to gain insight into the experiences of the participants as it related to their healthcare literacy. The data indicated an association between the healthcare experiences of African American men and their healthcare choices. The findings also revealed emerging behavioral themes, barriers to effective healthcare choices, and relationships between the healthcare experiences of African American men and their healthcare choices. Additional study findings suggested that there was a gap in effective leadership in the African American male population, which included progressive methods in the areas of healthcare knowledge acquisition and literacy, which is likely to have an impact on their future needs.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Holmes, Venita R.
Commitee:
School: University of Phoenix
School Location: United States -- Arizona
Source: DAI-A 70/11, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: African American Studies, Black studies, Educational leadership, Public health, Health education
Keywords: African-American, Black men health, Community education, Education leadership, Health choices, Health disparities, Information acquisition, Men, Men's health issues
Publication Number: 3384552
ISBN: 9781109472479
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