Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

A biocultural analysis of Nubian fetal pot burials from Askut, Sudan
by Britton, Lauren R., M.A., University of Central Florida, 2009, 112; 1481842
Abstract (Summary)

The skeletal remains in this study were excavated from the Nubian archaeological island fortress site of Askut (ca. 1850 BC - 1070 BC, New Kingdom/Third Intermediate period), located at the 2nd Cataract of the Nile river in Sudan. These remains were recovered as part of an archaeological expedition from 1962-1964, which was an effort to learn as much as possible about this site before the building of the High Dam in Aswan. Seven fetal skeletons (dated ca. 1260-770 BC) were examined for their biocultural significance. Biological analysis of these individuals indicates a range in developmental age from 36 to 40 weeks gestation. Three of the seven individuals show signs of pathology, including vertebral lesions, a deformed sphenoid, and cranial infectious bone reaction. These individuals, all interred in ceramic pots, were excavated from the pomoerium (the religious/sacred boundary or symbolic wall) of Askut's fortress. The interment style and burial location indicate that these individuals were treated differently in comparison to the children and adults of Askut, who were most likely buried in the cemeteries along the banks of the Nile. As Nubia was an Egyptian colony at this point in history, Egyptian influences and ideology would have had a large impact on Nubian culture, and this is reflected in the burial treatment of these individuals. Biocultural analyses of these individuals are used to interpret the particular burial patterns of these individuals.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Dupras, Tosha
Commitee:
School: University of Central Florida
School Location: United States -- Florida
Source: MAI 48/04M, Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Archaeology, Physical anthropology
Keywords:
Publication Number: 1481842
ISBN: 9781109680188
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