Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The relationship of teachers' parenting styles and Asian American students' reading motivation
by Ra, Alice, Ed.D., University of Southern California, 2009, 125; 3355451
Abstract (Summary)

Diana Baumrind developed a parenting styles framework to examine adult-control and the influences on child-rearing practices. Teachers and parents alike contribute to children’s socialization and development. Teachers create learning environments at school and parents shape socialization processes at home. This study examined teachers through the lens of Baumrind’s parenting styles framework. It is also an exploration of teachers’ parenting styles as they influence Asian American students’ reading motivation. The motivational constructs of self-efficacy and self-regulation were specifically examined since motivation is a variable that influences academic achievement. Eighteen teachers and 107 Asian American students in grades 4 and 5 from four Los Angeles County schools participated in the study. Previous studies indicated that both authoritarian and authoritative parenting styles are positively correlated to academic achievement in Asian Americans. Therefore, this study hypothesized that authoritarian and authoritative teachers would promote levels of reading self-efficacy and self-regulation for Asian American students. Results reveal that students whose teachers demonstrated high levels of authoritarian teaching behaviors have higher levels of reading self-efficacy than their peers.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Chung, Ruth H.
Commitee: Jones, Anne, Riconscente, Michelle M.
School: University of Southern California
Department: Education(Leadership)
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-A 70/05, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational psychology, Literacy, Reading instruction
Keywords: Academic achievement, Asian-American, Parenting, Reading motivation, Teachers
Publication Number: 3355451
ISBN: 978-1-109-14049-1
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