Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Academic self -concept and its relationship to student perceptions of engagement, membership, and authenticity in an alternative high school setting
by Wengler, Joseph Terence, Ed.D., Northern Illinois University, 2009, 182; 3369790
Abstract (Summary)

The purpose of this study was to determine if a correlation exists between the academic self-concept of students at an alternative suburban high school and their perceptions of engagement, membership, and authenticity within their learning environment. The student engagement model developed by Newmann, Wehlage, and Lamborn was utilized as the basis for a conceptual framework that represented the relationship between students’ innate need for competence and their ultimate level of academic self-concept resulting from their experiences at the school.

The study first sought to validate a posited relationship between academic self-concept and student engagement. The study then attempted to quantifiably validate the Newmann et al. student engagement model by targeting the specific constructs of membership and authenticity within it in order to demonstrate that they had a positive effect upon students’ academic self-concepts. Such a finding, the study hypothesized, would support the development of more constructive, strategic, and meaningful ways to improve student achievement outcomes.

The resulting data were significant. First, a strong positive correlation (r(52) = .68, p < .001) was found between the dependent variable of academic self-concept and the independent variable of engagement for the entire population. Second, a moderately strong positive correlation (r(52) = .45, p < .001) was found between the dependent variable of academic self-concept and the independent variable of membership for the entire population. Finally, a moderately strong positive correlation (r(52) = .46, p < .001) was found between the dependent variable of academic self-concept and the independent variable of authenticity for the entire population. The study’s findings suggest that for academic self-concept to develop, and for meaningful educational outcomes to emerge, humanistic student-centered pedagogy is essential.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Stahl, Norman A.
Commitee: Dorsch, Nina G., House, J. Daniel
School: Northern Illinois University
Department: Teaching and Learning
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: DAI-A 70/08, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Secondary education, Curriculum development
Keywords: Academic self-concept, Alternative high school, Authenticity, High schools, Membership, Pedagogy, Student engagement
Publication Number: 3369790
ISBN: 978-1-109-32395-5
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