Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Spatial and temporal patterns of summer season precipitation across the Carolina coastal region
by Carlson, Gretchen Stuppy, M.A., The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2009, 79; 1467324
Abstract (Summary)

Summer precipitation associated with synoptic-scale and mesoscale atmospheric processes is a common occurrence along the South and North Carolina coasts. The interaction between atmospheric circulation and the diurnal land-sea breeze circulation, combined with impacts from the Gulf Stream and the interface between the land-sea, conspire across multiple scales to produce precipitation along this complex coastline. This thesis analyzes the spatial and temporal patterns of warm season precipitation in relationship to synoptic atmospheric circulation over the coastal regions of North and South Carolina. Precipitation composites are developed for 16 atmospheric classes using WSR-88D stage IV radar estimates for June, July and August, 1996-2004 based on 3 parameters known to relate to the character of the land-sea breeze circulation (the time of day, synoptic flow direction, and the degree of synoptic forcing). In addition, intra-diurnal precipitation patterns are examined by dividing the 24 hour day into 12 two-hour increments for the most frequent flow directions (i.e. NW, SW and SE). Results indicate a distinct spatial and temporal precipitation pattern that varies based on the interaction of synoptic-scale and mesoscale atmospheric processes, most notably the land-sea breeze circulation.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Konrad, Charles E., II
Commitee: Bane, John M., Robinson, Peter J.
School: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Department: Geography
School Location: United States -- North Carolina
Source: MAI 47/06M, Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Geography
Keywords: Carolina, Gulf stream, Precipitation, Radar, Sea breeze, Summer
Publication Number: 1467324
ISBN: 9781109277616