Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Computer-based learning in neuroanatomy: A longitudinal study of learning, transfer, and retention
by Chariker, Julia H., Ph.D., University of Louisville, 2009, 101; 3370062
Abstract (Summary)

A longitudinal experiment was conducted to explore computer-based learning of neuroanatomy. Using a realistic 3D graphical model of neuroanatomy, and sections derived from the model, exploratory graphical tools were integrated into interactive computer programs so as to allow adaptive exploration. 72 participants learned either sectional anatomy alone or learned whole anatomy followed by sectional anatomy. Sectional anatomy was explored either in perceptually continuous animation or discretely, as in the use of an anatomical atlas. Learning was measured longitudinally to a high performance criterion. After learning, transfer to biomedical images and long-term retention was tested. Learning whole anatomy prior to learning sectional anatomy led to a more efficient learning experience. Learners demonstrated high levels of transfer from whole anatomy to sectional anatomy and from sectional anatomy to complex biomedical images. All learning groups demonstrated high levels of retention at 2–3 weeks.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor:
Commitee:
School: University of Louisville
School Location: United States -- Kentucky
Source: DAI-B 70/07, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Health education, Cognitive psychology, Educational technology, Science education
Keywords: Anatomy, Computer-based learning, Instruction, Learning, Neuroanatomy, Transfer, Transfer of learning
Publication Number: 3370062
ISBN: 9781109300697
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