Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Pop, place, and personal identity in the art of Roger Shimomura
by Stamey, Emily E., Ph.D., University of Kansas, 2009, 284; 3369461
Abstract (Summary)

This study demonstrates that an understanding of artists who foreground issues of ethnicity in their work need not be reduced to that single dimension. It does so by exploring the work of Japanese American artist Roger Shimomura (b.1939) both chronologically and thematically. In keeping with Shimomura literature to date, this project attends to the topic of ethnic stereotypes prominent in his oeuvre, but also investigates important subtexts. It examines the importance of 1960s pop artists to Shimomura's practice and considers how he has used pop strategies to develop pointedly personal and political work. It attends to the importance of Shimomura's dual homes in Seattle, Washington and Lawrence, Kansas, considering how ties to these locations have shaped his approach to depicting a third placeā€”the World War II Japanese incarceration camp Minidoka. And, this study examines Shimomura's many self portraits, noting how they counter assumptions of singular, fixed identities.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Cateforis, David, Eldredge, Charles
Commitee: Fowler, Sherry, Goddard, Stephen, Tsutsui, William
School: University of Kansas
Department: History of Art
School Location: United States -- Kansas
Source: DAI-A 70/08, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Art history
Keywords: Ethnicity, Identity, Japanese-American, Pop Art, Simomura, Roger
Publication Number: 3369461
ISBN: 9781109315714
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