Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

La nación encuadernada: La antología y la construcción de los imaginarios nacionales en Argentina, Uruguay y Chile en el siglo XIX (1824–1910)
by Campillo-Fenoll, Marcos, Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2009, 259; 3395567
Abstract (Summary)

This dissertation explores the production of literary anthologies during the nineteenth century in three countries of the Southern Cone (Argentina, Uruguay and Chile) in relationship with the discourses of nation building. Its main emphasis is the publication of national anthologies, which came to be used as part of cultural—and consequently political—maturity and independence.

Looking at the political significance of poetry during the nineteenth century and at the anthology as a metaphorical museum, my analysis questions the national imageries represented in these cultural products by looking primarily at three key elements. First, I examine the production and circulation of these anthologies in a cultural market avid for national works and how consumers gained access to them, highlighting the problematic character of the anthology as a symbolic good and commodity. Second, I uncover their ideological representations in regards to the construction of the origins of the nation. Major issues explored are those related to the formulation of links with a national pre-Hispanic past, the appropriation of the empirical figure of Christopher Columbus, and the obliteration or acceptance of the colonial past. Last, there is an analysis of the inclusion of women's poetry in these anthologies, examining the role of female poets in the construction of the nation. In this analysis, both textual and visual representations of women within the national imagery are explored, taking into account the "medallones" included in some of these anthologies.

This dissertation provides a careful analysis of the narrative of the nation within the anthological projects that span from the publication of the first collection of poetry in the Southern Cone (La lira argentina , 1824) to those anthologies created during the first decade of the twentieth century and during the Centennial of 1910. In this process, it unmasks the different contradictions and ambiguities that appear when editors and compilers try to represent a homogenous and endogamic society within their national context. In this sense, it tries to answer questions such as, what was the purpose behind their publication? who were the readers of these products? how did the anthologies circulate and how were they publicized among the reading public? what event manifested the beginning of the nation for these anthologists? and, finally, with what purpose was female poetry inserted in a male-dominated production?

My dissertation brings together the aforementioned issues related to questions of canon formation, nation-building, gender, and the economic market of symbolic goods. It highlights how literary works and cultural artifacts dialogue and negotiate with the political and intellectual processes of nation-building throughout the nineteenth-century. Anthologies analyzed include, but are not limited to, La lira argentina by Ramón Díaz (1824), El parnaso oriental by Luciano Lira (1835-37), América poética by Argentinean Juan María Gutiérrez (1846), the whole anthological production of Chilean José Domingo Cortés such as Flores chilenas (1862), Parnaso chileno (1871), Parnaso arjentino (1873), and Poetisas americanas (1875), and the Antología de poetas argentinos by Juan de la Cruz Puig (1910).

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Melendez, Mariselle
Commitee:
School: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: DAI-A 71/01, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Latin American literature
Keywords: Anthology, Argentina, Chile, De la Cruz Puig, Juan, Diaz, Ramon, Domingo Cortes, Jose, Gutierrez, Juan Maria, Lira, Luciano, National literature, Nineteenth century, Southern Cone, Uruguay
Publication Number: 3395567
ISBN: 9781109583755
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