Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Volunteer motivation among African American women: A perspective on purpose and meaning
by Chapman, Marneita V., Ed.D., The George Washington University, 2007, 150; 3297035
Abstract (Summary)

This study used a phenomenological method to investigate the role that values play in an individual's choice of a volunteer organization or activity. It sought to discover the essences of the lived experiences of fifteen, African American, female volunteers by using semi-structured, conversational interviews in which the participants described their experiences of providing help to others. A demographic questionnaire was also administered to each participant. The qualitative data were managed with Atlas_ti software and during the analysis of the data, a line-by-line examination was conducted which revealed recurring concepts, patterns, and themes.

The findings of this study supported the notion of congruence or "person-organization-fit" as ascertained from the analysis of the participants' perspectives. The findings revealed that the participants' beliefs and values, the connection to "self," and the bonding and forming of relationships with others were instrumental in their choosing an organization through which to provide help to others. The findings further identified learning and personal growth outcomes that were linked to the process of volunteering.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Chalofsky, Neal
Commitee: Konwerski, Peter, Marquardt, Michael
School: The George Washington University
Department: Human Resource Development
School Location: United States -- District of Columbia
Source: DAI-A 69/02, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: African Americans, Academic guidance counseling, Families & family life, Personal relationships, Sociology
Keywords: African-American, Meaning, Motivation, Volunteers, Women
Publication Number: 3297035
ISBN: 9780549438274
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