Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Children's reflections on cultural differences in ways of working together
by Roberts, Amy L. D., Ph.D., University of California, Santa Cruz, 2009, 45; 3394700
Abstract (Summary)

This study examines children's reflections on cultural patterns for organizing learning as seen in their characterizations of children's ways of working together. Pairs of children watched videos of Mexican Indigenous-heritage children and middle-class European American children folding origami and were asked to characterize how children work together differently in the two places. Research suggests that people in Indigenous communities of the Americas often collaborate through multimodal conversation (both nonverbal and verbal) and monitoring. This contrasts with the patterns of highly verbal interaction and working alone common in Western formal schools. Mexican heritage children attending US schools may have the opportunity to become familiar with both the collaboration through multimodal conversation and monitoring observed in Mesoamerican Indigenous-heritage communities, as well as the predominantly verbal working alone common in schools. US Mexican heritage children, in accordance with previous research, characterized the videos of Mexican Indigenous-heritage children as working together and helping more than the children in the middle-class European American videos.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Rogoff, Barbara
Commitee:
School: University of California, Santa Cruz
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-B 71/02, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Social psychology, Developmental psychology
Keywords: Children, Collaboration, Cultural differences, Helping, Metacognition
Publication Number: 3394700
ISBN: 9781109635454
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest