Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The Outgroup Solidarity Project: Making cross -race contact contagious
by Bearman, Steve, Ph.D., University of California, Santa Cruz, 2009, 67; 3367772
Abstract (Summary)

The Outgroup Solidarity Project was an intervention study aiming to reduce racial self-segregation in high schools. It sought to create contact between members of different race groups by seeding a new behavior into schools, a nonverbal greeting designed to promote cross-race contact. A small group of students introduced the greeting (the outgroup solidarity signal) in two large, racially diverse public high schools, attempting to spread it into the community. To assess the effectiveness of the intervention, we tracked the segregation levels of casual interactions as students passed between classes, and of clusters of students congregating during lunch periods. Over the 3–4 month intervention period, signal transmissions spread at one school. Cluster segregation dropped by at least 10% at both schools, corresponding with signal spread at one school. Implications for unobtrusively measuring self-segregation, and for underground approaches to reducing it, are discussed.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Thorne, Avril
Commitee:
School: University of California, Santa Cruz
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-B 70/07, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Bilingual education, Social psychology, Ethnic studies
Keywords: Contagion, Cross-race contact, Integration, Intergroup dynamics, Multiculturalism, Outgroup Solidarity Project, School integration, School-based intervention, Social acceptance
Publication Number: 3367772
ISBN: 9781109290875
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