Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The labor of literature: Gender and literary culture in Chile from dictatorship to democracy
by Griffin, Jane Deanne, Ph.D., University of California, Irvine, 2009, 265; 3369690
Abstract (Summary)

This dissertation seeks to understand the role literary culture has played in Chile's recent democratic transition from dictatorship to democracy. It traces the history of one of Chile’s most unique, yet rarely studied, marginal literary producers, the independent, feminist writing workshop and press, Ergo Sum and compares this group to similarly non-traditional literary producers of the newly democratic period, including the popular literary contest, Santiago en 100 Palabras, the independent local press Animita Cartonera, and one of the most important cultural figures of the post-dictatorial period, Pedro Lemebel. I argue that democracy has succeeded in moving marginal literature into the mainstream of national culture, but that these advances have produced the antidemocratic consequences of strengthening global neoliberal hegemony, increasing the state's authority to discipline the cultural sphere, and homogenizing sexual difference.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Johnson, Adriana
Commitee: Abbas, Ackbar, Hernandez-Torres, Ivette, Newman, Jane, Tinsman, Heidi
School: University of California, Irvine
Department: Comparative Literature - Ph.D.
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-A 70/08, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Comparative literature, Latin American literature, Gender studies
Keywords: Animita Cartonera, Book publishing, Chile, Ergo Sum, Gender, Gender studies, Latin American cultural studies, Lemebel, Pedro, Literary culture, Literature of the margins, Santiago en 100 Palabras, Southern Cone dictatorship
Publication Number: 3369690
ISBN: 9781109321357
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