Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Early school adjustment: Contributions of children's emotion self -regulation and classroom instructional and emotional supports
by Sylvester, Patricia R., Ph.D., The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2007, 142; 3272568
Abstract (Summary)

This study examined social competence as mediator of emotion self-regulation’s association with academic achievement and whether classroom supports moderated emotion self-regulation’s associations with social competence and academic achievement. Participants were 740 first-graders from a national prospective study. This study found that well regulated preschoolers became socially competent and academically successful first-graders. Social competence did not mediate emotion self-regulation’s association with academic achievement. Instructional support did not moderate emotion self-regulation’s association with academic achievement. Emotional support did not moderate emotion self-regulation’s association with social competence. Emotional support moderated emotion self-regulation’s association with academic achievement, but had a generally deleterious affect. This study’s findings stress the importance of emotion self-regulation to early school adjustment and raise questions concerning effects of classroom supports.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Meece, Judith L.
Commitee: Gallagher, Kathleen C., Gariepy, Jean Louis, Vernon-Feagans, Lynne, Ware, William B.
School: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Department: Education: Doctorate/Master's in Education
School Location: United States -- North Carolina
Source: DAI-A 68/06, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational psychology, Developmental psychology
Keywords: Children, Emotional supports, Instructional support, School adjustment, Self-regulation
Publication Number: 3272568
ISBN: 978-0-549-12240-1
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