Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Incidence of Streptococcus pneumoniae in the elderly nursing home patient after pneumococcal vaccination
by Schaefer, Cynthia, M.S.N., Northern Kentucky University, 2008, 35; 1450362
Abstract (Summary)

Streptococcus Pneumoniae infections cause more than 100,000-135,000 hospitalizations per year and death occurs in 14% of hospitalized adults with the disease. Fatality rates from invasive pneumococcal infections are highest in the elderly and patients with co-morbid conditions such as chronic lung disease, heart disease, or diabetes. The Health Belief Model is the theoretical framework that guided this descriptive study. The model explains why individuals use health services or seek medical care. In this project, a sample of 128 elderly clients' charts were used to find the incidence of newly diagnosed streptococcus pneumoniae infections after inoculation with the Pneumonia polysaccharide vaccine. Descriptive cross-tabulations with percentages were used for analysis. Results of the study showed that 109 (85%) of the 128 residents were inoculated with the Pneumonia polysaccharide vaccine. Of the 109 that received the Pneumonia polysaccharide vaccine, 3 (2.7%) acquired pneumonia. Of the 3 (2.7%) that acquired pneumonia after vaccination, 3 (100%) fell within the recommended parameters for re-inoculation. Of the 3 (2.7%) that acquired pneumonia after inoculation 3 (100%) received diagnosis after positive chest x-ray and 1 (33%) by culture and x-ray. These findings show evidence for the continual use of the Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine in the elderly or immunocompromised client. The findings also confirm the appropriateness of use of the Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine in future advanced nursing practice.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Robinson, Denise
Commitee: Conn, Tonia
School: Northern Kentucky University
Department: Nursing
School Location: United States -- Kentucky
Source: MAI 46/05M, Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Epidemiology
Keywords:
Publication Number: 1450362
ISBN: 9780549477501
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