Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Assessment of a permanent habitat module in the littoral zone of Onondaga Lake, New York with regard to spawning and juvenile habitat of fishes
by Thompson, Patricia F., M.S., State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry, 2007, 136; 1447435
Abstract (Summary)

The littoral zone of Onondaga Lake has been perturbed for more than 100 years. Researchers in the early 1990's hypothesized that juvenile fish habitat was limited by a lack of littoral macrophytes and that nesting substrate limitation was due to extensive industrially polluted sediments. A 1993 demonstration project showed that substrate and habitat modifications with a wind-break attracted fish nesting and juvenile fishes. The subsequent installation of a permanent wind-break at a site with a wetland re-connection in 2001 resulted in increased wetland-like habitat, reduced diversity and numbers of macroinvertebrates and had inconclusive results for fishes. Analysis of nest and juvenile fish data for Lepomis spp., largemouth and smallmouth bass found relationships between habitat and densities of nests and juvenile fish. Maps were generated to identify locations of the highest densities of nests and juveniles for use in lake restoration efforts. The construction of more habitat modules is not recommended.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Ringler, Neil H.
Commitee: Effler, Steven W., Farrell, John M., Madsen, John D., Schulz, Kimberley L., Winter, William T.
School: State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry
Department: Environmental & Forest Biology
School Location: United States -- New York
Source: MAI 46/03M, Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Ecology, Aquaculture, Fish production
Keywords: Artificial reefs, Juvenile fish habitat, Nest habitat, Onondaga Lake, Young-of-the-year densities
Publication Number: 1447435
ISBN: 9780549328193
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