Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

An empirical investigation of the contribution of computer self-efficacy, computer anxiety, and instructors' experience with the use of technology to their intention to use emerging educational technology in traditional classrooms
by Ball, Diane M., Ph.D., Nova Southeastern University, 2008, 142; 3297720
Abstract (Summary)

Over the past decade there has been a shift in the emphasis of emerging educational technology from use in online settings to supporting face-to-face and mixed delivery classes. Although emerging educational technology integration in the classroom has increased in recent years, technology acceptance and usage continue to be problematic for educational institutions.

In this predictive study the researcher aimed to predict university instructors' intention to use emerging educational technology in traditional classrooms based on the contribution of computer self-efficacy (CSE), computer anxiety (CA), and experience with the use of technology (EUT), as measured by their contribution to the prediction of behavioral intention (BI). Fifty-six instructors from a small, private university were surveyed to determine their level of CSE, CA, and EUT, and their intention to use emerging educational technology in traditional classrooms. A theoretical model was proposed, and two statistical methods were used to formulate models and test predictive power: Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) and Ordinal Logistic Regression (OLR). It was predicted that CSE, CA, and EUT would have a significant impact on instructors' intention to use emerging educational technology in the classroom. Results showed overall significant models of the three aforementioned factors in predicting instructors' use of emerging educational technology in traditional classrooms. Additionally, results demonstrated that CSE was a significant predictor of the use of emerging educational technology in the classroom, while CA and EUT were not found to be significant predictors.

Two important contributions of this study include (1) an investigation of factors that contribute to instructors' acceptance of an emerging educational technology that has been developed specifically to respond to current demands of higher education, and (2) an investigation of key constructs contributing to instructors' intention to use emerging educational technology in the classroom.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Levy, Yair
Commitee: Ellis, Timothy, Snyder, Martha
School: Nova Southeastern University
Department: Information Systems
School Location: United States -- Florida
Source: DAI-A 69/02, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational software
Keywords: Computer anxiety, Educational technology, Emerging educational technology, Factors influencing technology use, Self-efficacy, Technology acceptance, Technology in education, Technology use in the classroom, Traditional classrooms
Publication Number: 3297720
ISBN: 9780549486091
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