Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

A descriptive Rorschach study of children who have experienced chronic complex abuse
by Tiedemann-Fuller, Pamela Meghan, Ph.D., Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2008, 76; 3345859
Abstract (Summary)

This study provides a quantitative description of the impact of chronic, complex abuse on the object relations and intrapsychic functioning of children. Specifically, data regarding the Rorschach variables of 232 children and adolescents, ages 5-18 at the time of testing, who have experienced chronic complex abuse are reported and discussed within an object relations framework. Variables from Exner's Comprehensive System, Urist's Mutuality of Autonomy Scale, Kwawer's Interpersonal Modes of Relating, and Gacono and Meloy's Aggression Variables are used. The results are consistent with object relations theory, indicating deficits in ability to think about experience, reduced coping capacity, polarized representations of self and other, denial of dependency needs, internalized aggression, maladaptive interpersonal behavior, and fragmentation. In addition, historical and clinical data characterizing the sample are reported. This data yielded useful information regarding etiology as well as caregiver and provider perception of these children. Treatment that does not assume the presence of psychological resources and that helps these children gradually develop a degree of integration, ego strength, and the capacity for mentalization is indicated.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Panajian, Avedis
Commitee:
School: Pacifica Graduate Institute
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-B 70/01, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Clinical psychology, Personality psychology
Keywords: Abuse, Children, Descriptive, Neglect, Rorschach
Publication Number: 3345859
ISBN: 9781109006483
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