Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The lived experience of HIV/AIDS: A Heideggerian hermeneutical analysis
by Reillo, Michelle Renee, Ph.D., College of Notre Dame of Maryland, 2008, 199; 3302672
Abstract (Summary)

The purpose of this Heideggerian hermeneutical phenomenological study was to explore the lived experience of AIDS. Thirteen individuals, who were infected and affected by HIV/AIDS, ages eight to sixty, were recruited from a large metropolitan city for participation in this study. Interviews and cognitive representations were interpreted and emerging themes were presented within the Heideggerian existentials of lived time, lived relation to others, lived body, and lived space. Individuals with HIV/AIDS residing in suburban areas of the metropolitan city displayed characteristics consistent with the Heideggerian definition of authenticity: connectedness with others, presence of conscience, ability to empathize, and truthfulness in discourse. Individuals residing within the inner city were found to exhibit characteristics consistent with the Heideggerian definition of inauthenticity: disconnectedness, lack of conscience, inability to empathize, and untruthfulness in discourse. Presentation of the adult informants' lived experiences of HIV/AIDS within the four Heideggerian existentials is provided within the context of the two phenomenologically discerned groups. Future research is suggested to determine the incidence of psychopathy among children and adolescents in urban environments and actions for professional educators are proposed.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Hobbs, Clarissa Robins
Commitee:
School: College of Notre Dame of Maryland
School Location: United States -- Maryland
Source: DAI-A 69/02, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Academic guidance counseling, Nursing, Public health
Keywords: AIDS, Authenticity, HIV, HIV/AIDS, Heidegger, Martin, Heideggerian, Hermeneutics, Lived experience, Phenomenology
Publication Number: 3302672
ISBN: 9780549487623
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest