Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Exploring the relationship between emotional intelligence and academic achievement in African American female college students
by Bradshaw, Felicia Bell, Ph.D., College of Notre Dame of Maryland, 2008, 266; 3304794
Abstract (Summary)

This study investigated the relationship between emotional intelligence factors and academic achievement in academically successful African American female college students. A purposive sample of 60 successful undergraduate female African American college students at local colleges and universities in a mid-Atlantic area were asked to voluntarily participate in this research study.

Participants were asked to complete quantitative testing instruments which included: (1) the Subject Demographic Survey, (2) the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test, (3) the Bar-On Emotional Quotient Test: Short and (4) the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test, Second Edition. Next, in-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with twenty academically successful college-aged African American females to clarify understanding and supplement findings presented in the quantitative portion of the study. The methodology chosen solicited the students' perceptions about emotional intelligence as they relate to academic achievement.

Quantitative findings from the current study revealed: (1) no statistically significant correlation between African American female college students' emotional intelligence level and their academic performance (GPA); (2) a weak correlation between Stress Management [a component of emotional intelligence] and the academic performance (GPA) of African American female college students and (3) no statistically significant difference between African American female college students' emotional intelligence level and their academic level. Qualitative findings from the current study provided explanatory power behind the quantitative findings because the qualitative interviews captured the components of the Bar-On Emotional Quotient Test: Short. The qualitative data also provided explanatory power beyond the quantitative findings in four additional themes: (1) a sense of identity as a woman, (2) association with African American heritage, (3) family structure or responsibility within the family structure, and (4) community connectedness and obligations.

It is important to further search the literature for instruments more sensitive to the relationship between emotional intelligence factors and academic achievement. Suggestions are made regarding curriculum development, the advising of students and student growth and development. Recommendations are made to replicate: (1) the study in another urban setting, (2) the study in a rural area and (3) the study using successful African American male college students in a similar environment.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Suarez, Debra
Commitee:
School: College of Notre Dame of Maryland
School Location: United States -- Maryland
Source: DAI-A 69/03, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: African Americans, Womens studies, Educational psychology, Higher education
Keywords: Academic achievement, African-American, African-American females, College students, College women, Emotional intelligence
Publication Number: 3304794
ISBN: 9780549507994
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